Author Topic: 3 examples, including a "circus wagon" "restoration" of a Gamewell box  (Read 1897 times)

Offline \\-olff

  • Professional Sculptor
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 231
  • Sculptor
Here's 3 examples, the first photo shows one of these "circus wagon" so called "restorations" it doesn't have the silly looking flagpole eagles on top but I'm surprised it wasn't added. This 100+ year old antique never looked like this even when it was brand new! They never highlighted all that stuff with white paint like this on these boxes. Note that despite all the fancy paint, it only fetched $250 at auction, my guess is largely because those who want a real antique, one that hasn't been "messed with" like this, don't want to pay for damaged goods like this.


The second photo shows an identical Gamewell box, this one had been repainted but notice how much more of a true restoration this is, it is a more true restoration bbecause this is how the box looked when it came from the factory- painted all red. The 3rd photo shows a 1920s era model in an as-found condition, it too looks like it has not been "messed with" and has the old paint on it intact.
These two boxes keep within the spirit of maintaining an ANTIQUE in good condition, and without ruining it's history and antique appearance by applying amateurish, silly eagle ornaments and inappropriate custom paints.
Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark

Offline \\-olff

  • Professional Sculptor
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 231
  • Sculptor
Re: 3 examples, including a "circus wagon" "restoration" of a Gamewell box
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2015, 07:35:35 PM »
Here's another one of these amateur "restorers" who thinks the circus wagon paint jobs on a 100 year old antique is appropriate!

Quote
This is a restored gamewell fire alarm box. It dates from the late 1800's to early 1900's. It has been completely disassembled. Taken down to bare metal. Primed and painted. All the brass parts have been cleaned and a coating of laquer has been applied to prevent tarnishing.
You DON'T apply lacquer to the brass movement and gears, this guy DID according to the photos he put up, geez what are people thinking??

Quote
...All the instruction lettering has been painted white with an attention to detail. The trademark Gamewell fist and lighting bolts have been painted in metallic gold and silver.
Attention to detail? you mean giving the lettering a circus wagon effect?

But now read what he says, get ready- wait for it!


Quote
I know this is not how it was found on a street corner but I just like how it looks.

So because he "likes" how it looks that's his excuse for ruining a 100 year old antique! forget that he doesn't even have to look at it now he is SELLING it!

Quote
The instruction lettering also has been painted white with an attention to detail. The lock for the inside box is there but I dont have the key.
I noticed that, he also painted the box super gloss BLACK with white lettering, how clueless... He does all this "restoration" to the box and yet, he doesn't even bother to get the KEY for it!
Quote
Inside the telegraph mechanism is a Peerless and has a date of October 19th 1917.
And it's been damaged too, we know that much...
Quote
All the other electrical components are there and have been completely disassembled, cleaned, lacquered and reassembled. Its missing the glass over the telegraph mechanism.
You don't LACQUER electrical components, idiot! And yet, through all this he didn't even bother replacing the missing glass, so there's no glass, no key.

Quote
Overall its pretty complete and looks great.
It's not "restored" and it looks like a circus wagon, or a cheap red fiberglass reproduction from China, this kind of stupid gloss black, silver,gold and white crap is better suited for CAROUSEL HORSES- something that was meant to be polychromed from day one.





Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark

Offline \\-olff

  • Professional Sculptor
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 231
  • Sculptor
Here's another one with not only a crazy "circus wagon" paint job with strange white "dots" but the white painting is so sloppy it's run off some of the letters. I'm going to call this one "Sloppy dots"



Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark

Offline \\-olff

  • Professional Sculptor
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 231
  • Sculptor
Looks like the guy who painted the inner box gloss black to make the brass "pop" is back, busy again ruining this time an 1880 Excelsior box:

Quote

Its the very early style box and has a patent date on the mechanism of Sept. 21 1880. I completely disassembled the box. Its been stripped. Primed. Painted. Polished and all the brass parts have a coating of laquer to keep them shining

As we all know, lacquer turns yellow and fails as all paints and coatings do, so someone will have to take this antique apart yet again to clean all that lacquer crud out.

As before, we see his trademark "circus wagon" repaint on the Gamewell logo, and the polished brass sand-cast cole keyguard door and lock cover.
As before he "restored' this and wants over $800 for it, but didn't bother replacing a $1 piece of missing glass or a $5 missing key.

These boxes often come up for sale for under $350, anyone paying $800 is crazy to begin with.
I would not buy this box for $350, it would be more work to undo his lacquering of the brass and mechanism inside, removing not only that plastic-ey looking paint from the outside but the gloss black paint inside as well.
Then there's the surface etching damage he caused by sandblasting this.
Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark