Author Topic: Ca 1896 Gamewell register restoration  (Read 3435 times)

Offline \\-olff

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Ca 1896 Gamewell register restoration
« on: November 26, 2015, 01:36:26 AM »
I bought a gamewell brass and bevelled glass punch register, price was right! it weighs 36 pounds. I did a little research to see if i could date it based on the builder's plate, it has their office address at what in the script looks like 142 but in an 1893 ad I found it was actually 1 1-2 (112) Barclay st. In an 1897 publication they use 19 Barclay st, so it would seem that sometime between 1893 and 1897 they moved from 112 to 19, so that would date this register to between those two years.

112 Barclay st looks nothing at all like the last photo, there's a modern glass skyscraper there now, you couldn't find anything there that would be recognizeable, even the building with the mansarded roof is long gone too.
   
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Re: Ca 1896 Gamewell register restoration
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2015, 01:41:39 AM »
Time has come to look into someone who can replace the massive 1-1/4" wide by .033" mainspring for my Gamewell punch register that I bought earlier in the summer pretty cheap.
 The machine is solid brass with thick bevelled glass, I knew when I bought it the spring was broken that was a given, but the price was so reasonable I couldn't pass it up, in fact, after getting this HEAVY machine and seeing the quality of it I wished I had bought the other one he had, but when I went to look it was already sold. I did wind up with the better of the two however smile emoticon
 It weighs a hefty 36 pounds!
 The machine  has 3 solid brass plates 1/4" thick comprising the main structure of it, and then the gears are also solid brass except for the steel shafts and the smaller gear ends, the gears are just works of art in of themselves, you examine them in hand and you can feel and see the quality of materials and workmanship is supurb.
 There's also one gear in this that has multiple tiny parts to it, every one of them had to be hand made and properly fitted.
 The Gamewell builder's plate shows a Barclay Street address, one the company moved from around 1897 from what I've been able to find, that dates this machine to ca 1895 or thereabouts.
 Just look at the photos taken from above looking down how complicated the gear train is and all the small parts, it had to be completely taken apart to remove the mainspring case and for cleaning.
 I located a fellow who replaces springs such as this who is  a clock maker/repair business and sent him the photos of the broken spring and the dim's of it.
 Looks like he can replace the spring for me, it's about 16 feet long for $129 and load it up into the barrel for me for another $10 which is well worth the $10 since I've replaced a mainspring on a similar punch register but it had a much smaller spring and man, it was like trying to keep a lid on a container full of angry snakes trying to  escape, and the greasy spring was slippery and it was on my fingers, it was definitely a white knuckle affair but I did get the repaired spring back in, I wouldn't even try it with a spring like this one has!
 Once I get the working spring barrel returned to me I can start re-assembling the machine, I'm  really wanting to see how this thing works once it has spring power in it to run it!



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Offline \\-olff

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Re: Ca 1896 Gamewell register restoration
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2015, 01:42:45 AM »
In the mail I received back my Gamewell punch register mainspring and barrel, with the old broken spring replaced with new by Larry of TimeWise. Now I can start finishing the cleaning the unit up and re-assembling it.

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Re: Ca 1896 Gamewell register restoration
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2015, 01:44:01 AM »
I spent some time today cleaning up a few more pieces that needed to be done yet, and I started to re-assemble the punch register. After the 2nd photo there was one more component to put in, the most complicated single component in this  machine, made of multiple small parts, a couple of springs and more, it sets in between and around several gears where  a small piece of metal on it rests like a stylus on the 3rd gear from the right which has a much larger diameter rod, that rod has course threads on it and the small stylus like part rests on that like a needle on a phonograph, in fact it works very similarly in that as the gear turns the threads move that stylus to the right and there is a tiny pin on the side of the 2nd gear that contacts the stylus' top and that stops the machine as a cycle is completed at that point.
 There's also a tiny adjustable spring on that component that helps pull the stylus-like end down onto the threads.
 There is a trip lever that doesn't seem like it is in the right position, the coils pull down on armatures but there's not  a lot of movement, it's part of that movement that trips the lever which lifts the style arm away from that small pin so a spring pulls it left where it starts the cycle.
 Quite remarkable how this works and once it's seen how it works it makes perfect sense.
 After re-assembling the second side and putting some of the main screws back loosly, I only wound the spring slightly just in case I had to take something back out again, but I wound it enough the gear train was working.



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Offline \\-olff

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Re: Ca 1896 Gamewell register restoration
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2015, 01:49:32 AM »
Restored ca 1895 Gamewell register.
 After cleaning the unit, and having the broken mainspring replaced by Larry at TimeWise, it is re-assembled except for a couple of components and the beveled glass. The video shows just the gear train working, no paper, ink or DC yet.

I had to take one of the movement plates back off again as there was a tiny reed switch that is screwed to the plate by the mainspring barrel and there's no way to access it's screw with the spring barrel in place. It was a little switch I had in a box that I thought I could rewire it's leads and put in later. The two wires on it had to be replaced as their insulation was so brittle it was flaking off. That's about the only time one should replace the original wires with look-alikes.

Also, the little spring show was accidentally stretched out of shape, a quick fix for that to return it back to it's original lengh was slipping it over a rod I clamped in my bench vice and compressing the spring, and then holding it compressed while heating it just red hot with a torch and letting it cool while holding it, once cool it was back to it's correct original length. The spring is held at one end and is adjustable by the knurled knob which has a small cord on it.

The two old wires had to be replaced, most of the insulation was gone as the photo shows, and just handling them crumbled more off.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tviy9b6uT3g
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Offline \\-olff

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Re: Ca 1896 Gamewell register restoration
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2015, 01:51:20 AM »
« Last Edit: November 26, 2015, 01:54:58 AM by \\-olff »
Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark