Author Topic: Horni Signal complete box  (Read 1559 times)

Offline \\-olff

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Horni Signal complete box
« on: December 15, 2015, 09:00:42 PM »
The box arrived today, and as I knew it would- my flat Gamewell key fits the lock on this Horni Signal box and opened the door, I was pleasantly surprised with what was inside!
The seller didn't have a key to the door- it's really difficult to try to sell something for a decent price if you can't show/prove what's inside but this seller's other items for sale were obviously garage and estate sale pickings of every kind, so I knew he had absolutely no idea about these and didn't even bother.
 The thing is 100% complete and original, and no one had messed with it, even the easy to lose separate shunt knob is still hanging on the inner door!
 The glass is intact and the porcelain block with the lightning protector is in place as well, this box must have been taken directly out of service and sold.

This box is in excellent and as-found condition and needs absolutely nothing done to it other than just a little cleaning, and lubrication on the mechanism.
 So I got a great deal on this box made no later than 1946 when the manufacturer went out of business.
Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark

Offline \\-olff

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Re: Horni Signal complete box
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2015, 10:27:35 PM »

It's all cleaned up and mounted on the wall now, to do both I had to remove the bell tapper assembly, and took a pics of the back  and front of it, with the  bakelite cover off I noticed a small paper label so I looked up what I could read on it- "Ward Leonard, vitrohm 45" turned out Ward Leonard made electrical resistors, switches and rheostats, motor controls and more,  holding numerous patents and awards they even had a hand with some of the electrical items at the 1900 Paris exposition.

The company is still in business!  reading about Mr Leonard's early history a lot becomes obvious- he went to M.I.T and graduated in 1883 and then worked for Western Electric- seems all the great inventors of the day went to M.I.T. and worked for Western Electric and the others!  He also produced Ward Leonard motor cars, sounds a lot to me like M.P. Moller now!   

Here's some history on him, funny what one can find inside some piece of equipment all because of  a little paper label.


 http://www.wardleonard.com/filephotos/1/_miscel/PDFs/Ward-Leonard_75-Yrs-of-Progress.pdf


Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark

Gabe1577

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Re: Horni Signal complete box
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2016, 05:05:25 PM »
Hello, I am currently restoring a SAFA box, that is almost identical to the Horni boxes. I have already stripped the paint of, and plan to prime soon. If anyone has any tips on SAFA boxes, please let me know. Thanks

Offline \\-olff

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Re: Horni Signal complete box
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2016, 10:07:54 PM »
Yes, they are pretty much the same as the Horni Signal box other than minor changes and the logo differences of course.
I am not a fan of stripping the original paint off unless it's really necessary, the Horni Signal box shown here will not be repainted since I want my antiques to look like antiques not brand new, but  the movement was cleaned and oiled and the case washed in hot soapy water.

Some have said the Rustoleum International Red is a good match for most, but being an oil based paint its tricker to use, but oil paint would be the more authentic paint to use. I do not spray the paint on any that need paint I use a brush like the city crews did, in fact, in an early old Harrington-Seaburg fire alarm photo showing the plant, one guy has  some boxes on a work bench and he's obviously applying the paint to the boxes with a brush while holding a can of paint in his other hand.
They may have gone to spraying later, but oil based brush paint was the paint that was used back then.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2016, 10:11:55 PM by \\-olff »
Sculptures are drawings you fall over in the dark